Lakers Nation tweets, deletes potentially controversial anti-Clipper emojis

lakers nation anti clipper emoji cropped

Lakers Nation, a blog that covers the famous NBA team (of which I am fan, full disclosure), misstepped Sunday when taking to Twitter to taunt the Laker-rival Clippers, who were nearing their season-ending loss to the Houston Rockets.

The potentially controversial tweet had an emoji of a sailboat, the Clippers’ former logo, and another emoji of a gun, pointed at the sailboat. The caption read “Shhhhh. Just close your eyes. It will all be over soon.”

The tweet was said to be deleted.

The blog apparently did not learn from a recent, similar snafus.

Late last month, the Rockets were on the verge of eliminating the Dallas Mavricks when the former’s social media person reportedly tweeted a horse emoji, and beside it, a gun emoji, with the same caption.

According to CBS Local, the “social media manager” later lost his job.

Lakers Nation was not the only ones in the journalism world to have the gun emoji pointed at a Clipper-related emoji.

While CBS Local reported the backlash directed at the Rockets Twitter snafus came from “animal activists,” there may be some who feel the anti-Clipper tweets, just by including a gun pointed at something representing the team, promote violence. Therefore a better way to engage followers would have been reporting informative and interesting stats.

City News’ Shauna Hunt’s tweet reportedly gets someone “in connection with” FHRITP behavior fired

One reporter’s tweet recently lead to someone getting apparently fired.

A trend has emerged of various individuals — sometimes the source answering a reporter’s question, other times a passerby — interrupting live broadcasts by saying “F**k her right in the p***y.”

But things got serious when reporter Shauna Hunt took to task a group of onlookers who looked to be defending the prank.

Hunt later tweeted a video of the exchange.

And now, according to CBC, “Ontario’s largest electricity provider, Hydro One, issued a statement saying it has fired one of its employees in connection with the lewd disruption Sunday at a Toronto FC game.”

In a later interview, Hunt talked about the groundswell of support in response to her tweet.

“A lot of other men are speaking out and saying ‘I’m disgusted. On behalf of all men, I apologize for their behavior.’”

She talked more about it in another interview.

Emojis in social media posts: have they become a thing in journalism?

On Wednesday, KCRW, an L.A. public radio station, used emojis in a tweet that promoted its “Morning Becomes Eclectic” show.

That same day, BuzzFeed News used one in an Instagram post about the NFL’s “Deflategate” investigation.

Emoji’s have seemingly become almost a standard in everyday communication, but it’s still fairly surprising to see them in news outlets’ social media posts even two years after USA Today, perhaps jokingly, tried their hand at it.

That tweet was later highlighted in this piece.

In it, journalism professionals dismissed emoji-use.

However, Gregory Norfleet, identified as editor of West Branch Times, shared advantages:

“I’ve never used emoji nor emoticons, but if it makes for a better headline or graphic — more reader-friendly — I would. Readers, voters, taxpayers, etc. — if it draws them in to read the story, they become MORE informed.”

Fast forward to 2015, it looks like journalism has not fully embraced them. Both Instagram and Twitter lets users (or me, at least) search for emojis, but seeing them in journalism social media posts remains unlikely despite how often they are used casually.