Tag Archives: ESPN

Twitter reacts to tweeted apparent medical record

ESPN reporter Adam Schefter, recently ranked one of the most-followed broadcast journalists on Twitter, is facing a sharp backlash after what appears to be an NFL player’s medical record showing up in a tweet under his account.

The apparent record was a document of the New York Giant’s Jason Pierre-Paul getting his finger amputated, reportedly due to a Fourth of July fireworks accident.

The tweet received a flood of negative responses, some of which came from people in and around professional sports.

NFL player James Harrison:

NFL player Chris Long:

NFL Draft Analyst Montel Hardy:

Prodessinal baseball player Drew Storen:

Also on Twitter, “#HIPAA,” which “protects the privacy of individually identifiable health information,” is trending.

But it’s an invasion of privacy issue, not an HIPAA one, says Sports Illustrated Legal Analyst Michael McCann.

McCann also addressed what would happen if the team for which Pierre-Paul plays leaked the info to Schefter.

Here is more of the reaction from the sports world.

[Update – 7/13/2015]

Schefter, on SI.com, explained to SI.com’s Richard Deitsch why he tweeted the picture and how he got it.

Here is his reasoning in what Deitsch said was an emailed interview between him and Schefter:

This was a public figure and franchise player involved in a widely speculated accident with potential criminal behavior in which there was a cone of secrecy that surrounded him for five days that not even his own team could crack. This wasn’t as if some player were admitted to the hospital with a secret illness or disease—we’ve seen those cases over the years, as recently as this past year even. This one was different and unique for a variety of reasons. The extent of his injuries were going to come to light, maybe that day or later that week, but soon. They’re horrific injuries, incredibly unfortunate for the player. But in a day and age in which pictures and videos tell stories and confirm facts, in which sources and their motives are routinely questioned, and in which reporters strive to be as accurate as possible, this was the ultimate supporting proof.

Asked how he got the picture:

All I will say is I never once requested a single image from anyone at any time; the images came to me.

Here is more of the interview with Schefter.

With Discover, Snapchat brings back professionally-crafted news

As announced last year it would, Snapchat now offers the Discover section of their application. In the section, users can see news outlets that have joined the feature and swipe through the news organizations’ video and written content for that day.

Techcrunch says the feature signals a step away from citizen journalism:

“This new Discover page puts media at the forefront of Snapchat’s product. Brands and publishers are delivering content to users as opposed to relying solely on content users create to power usage of the company.”

After I tried it out, it actually appears to represent a major step away from citizen journalism.

A menu of brands showing their content on Discover…

snapchat discover

A screenshot of a video news report I got after hitting CNN…

CNN on snapchat discover

A screenshot of a video highlight I got after hitting ESPN…

ESPN on snapchat discover

Here is a look at how other outlets, People Magazine and Yahoo News, apparently used the feature:

Discover acts as a cross between a news app and a video-streaming service, especially with the ESPN stream concluding its series of game highlights and analysis with its iconic Sportscenter theme song, usually heard on TV.

The focus on quality of content is unsurprising considering Snapchat reportedly brought on board former newspeople to work on the feature.

When rumors emerged last year about Snapchat’s Discover section, BuzzFeed was among the news outlets reportedly in talks to be featured. However, as of the second day of the section being up, BuzzFeed has not been shown and it remains unclear why.

[Update: BuzzFeed’s failure to be featured was due to a disagreement in how the blog’s content would look, per The Wall Street Journal]

Snapchat is not totally anti-citizen journalism. In June 2014, it announced the Our Story feature that lets users add their post to a series of posts from a certain event. From the looks of it, Our Story will stay in tact.

November brought a trend of journos’ Twitter gaffes

Perhaps some reporters should return to using Twitter as a reporting tool.

Last Sunday, Awful Announcing, a blog covering sports media, announced it “severed its relationship” with Steve Lepore, one of its writers. Sports blog Deadspin reports the move came after Lepore, on Twitter, treated women inappropriately by “[asking] what sort of photos they might be willing to pose for.”

His actions mark the third recent incident involving journalists’ Twitter use.

In another Twitter blunder, student reporter Marisa Martin came under fire after tweeting an insensitive “joke” about Jameis Winston, a Florida State University football player.

The Washington Post:

Marisa Martin, a student at the University of Alabama, tweeted the following on Wednesday night: “Reported gunman on the FSU campus. Maybe he is heading for Jameis,” a reference to Seminoles quarterback Jameis Winston. When criticized by other Twitter users for her comment, she defended her Tweet: “Since apparently I cant make a joke in all seriousness I hope everyone at FSU is safe & that the gunman is found. But I stand by my opinions.”

Winston, who is facing sexual assault accusations, was the victim of another tweet that was not just insensitive, but potentially libelous. San Francisco Chronicle’s Ann Killion reportedly tweeted “C’mon Boston College. Beat the rapist,” before deleting the tweet and apologizing.

But at ESPN, one writer was punished for behavior on Twitter that was less offensive. ESPN writer Keith Law, according to Slate, took to Twitter to debate baseball analyst Curt Schilling on evolution. Per Slate, ESPN suspended Law from Twitter, but claimed the punishment “had absolutely nothing to do with his opinions on the subject.”

While journalists can benefit from humanizing themselves on Twitter, it is important for them to do so professionally. The debate on evolution did just that, but the other cases show some reporters struggle to strike that balance.

Snapchat set to unvail news-friendly, ‘Discover’ section

While prominent news orgs have already harnessed Snapchat, the social media app with the sort-of vanishing posts, it looks like the private messenger will attract more publications.

Digiday reports Snapchat is poised to roll out a section, called Discover, for news and other types of content from publishers. News orgs with which Snapchat has begun talks include Vice, ESPN, BuzzFeed and National Geographic.

Digiday:

“The conversations illustrate just how grand Snapchat’s media distribution ambitions are. It’s natural for Snapchat to want to partner with Comedy Central and National Geographic since they specialize in creating compelling video and still imagery, the two kinds of messages Snapchat trades in. But Snapchat also wants to serve its users text and audio, which would make it an all-inclusive media consumption app.”

However, it is surprising that NatGeo would be interested in Discover. While Digiday is correct in that NatGeo’s captivating content lends itself to visual media, the image and video quality on Snapchat does not measure up to Instagram, where NatGeo shines.

ESPN’s Grantland gets artsy with Steve Nash documentary, ‘The Finish Line’

NBA player Steve Nash joined the Los Angeles Lakers in July 2012, but since then has spent most of his life off the court recovering from injuries.

The 40-year-old’s journey tending to these injuries, as well as facing his grim, NBA future, is chronicled in a YouTube documentary series called “The Finish Line.” The surprisingly cinematic series, presented by ESPN’s Grantland on their YouTube channel, debuted February 14 13 with its second and most recent installment coming February 28.

Sports media blog Awful Announcing calls the series “outstanding.”

“We’ve grown accustomed to the site churning out articles with varying degrees of success, but this video series is a step in a new and refreshing direction. They’re no stranger to video (Grantland has 561 videos on their YouTube page), but this is new territory. The feature on Nash is a personal look at one of the most familiar names in the NBA at the end of the career.”

The production team behind the project, Hock Films, is led by Emmy-winning filmmaker Jonathan Hock and has specialized in sports docs, making some with ESPN. However, the Nash project apparently marks the first on social media. Hock discussed his experience reporting for the series in this ESPN radio interview.