Tag Archives: Twitter fail

Twitter reacts to tweeted apparent medical record

ESPN reporter Adam Schefter, recently ranked one of the most-followed broadcast journalists on Twitter, is facing a sharp backlash after what appears to be an NFL player’s medical record showing up in a tweet under his account.

The apparent record was a document of the New York Giant’s Jason Pierre-Paul getting his finger amputated, reportedly due to a Fourth of July fireworks accident.

The tweet received a flood of negative responses, some of which came from people in and around professional sports.

NFL player James Harrison:

NFL player Chris Long:

NFL Draft Analyst Montel Hardy:

Prodessinal baseball player Drew Storen:

Also on Twitter, “#HIPAA,” which “protects the privacy of individually identifiable health information,” is trending.

But it’s an invasion of privacy issue, not an HIPAA one, says Sports Illustrated Legal Analyst Michael McCann.

McCann also addressed what would happen if the team for which Pierre-Paul plays leaked the info to Schefter.

Here is more of the reaction from the sports world.

[Update – 7/13/2015]

Schefter, on SI.com, explained to SI.com’s Richard Deitsch why he tweeted the picture and how he got it.

Here is his reasoning in what Deitsch said was an emailed interview between him and Schefter:

This was a public figure and franchise player involved in a widely speculated accident with potential criminal behavior in which there was a cone of secrecy that surrounded him for five days that not even his own team could crack. This wasn’t as if some player were admitted to the hospital with a secret illness or disease—we’ve seen those cases over the years, as recently as this past year even. This one was different and unique for a variety of reasons. The extent of his injuries were going to come to light, maybe that day or later that week, but soon. They’re horrific injuries, incredibly unfortunate for the player. But in a day and age in which pictures and videos tell stories and confirm facts, in which sources and their motives are routinely questioned, and in which reporters strive to be as accurate as possible, this was the ultimate supporting proof.

Asked how he got the picture:

All I will say is I never once requested a single image from anyone at any time; the images came to me.

Here is more of the interview with Schefter.

Lakers Nation tweets, deletes potentially controversial anti-Clipper emojis

lakers nation anti clipper emoji cropped

Lakers Nation, a blog that covers the famous NBA team (of which I am fan, full disclosure), misstepped Sunday when taking to Twitter to taunt the Laker-rival Clippers, who were nearing their season-ending loss to the Houston Rockets.

The potentially controversial tweet had an emoji of a sailboat, the Clippers’ former logo, and another emoji of a gun, pointed at the sailboat. The caption read “Shhhhh. Just close your eyes. It will all be over soon.”

The tweet was said to be deleted.

The blog apparently did not learn from a recent, similar snafus.

Late last month, the Rockets were on the verge of eliminating the Dallas Mavricks when the former’s social media person reportedly tweeted a horse emoji, and beside it, a gun emoji, with the same caption.

According to CBS Local, the “social media manager” later lost his job.

Lakers Nation was not the only ones in the journalism world to have the gun emoji pointed at a Clipper-related emoji.

While CBS Local reported the backlash directed at the Rockets Twitter snafus came from “animal activists,” there may be some who feel the anti-Clipper tweets, just by including a gun pointed at something representing the team, promote violence. Therefore a better way to engage followers would have been reporting informative and interesting stats.

November brought a trend of journos’ Twitter gaffes

Perhaps some reporters should return to using Twitter as a reporting tool.

Last Sunday, Awful Announcing, a blog covering sports media, announced it “severed its relationship” with Steve Lepore, one of its writers. Sports blog Deadspin reports the move came after Lepore, on Twitter, treated women inappropriately by “[asking] what sort of photos they might be willing to pose for.”

His actions mark the third recent incident involving journalists’ Twitter use.

In another Twitter blunder, student reporter Marisa Martin came under fire after tweeting an insensitive “joke” about Jameis Winston, a Florida State University football player.

The Washington Post:

Marisa Martin, a student at the University of Alabama, tweeted the following on Wednesday night: “Reported gunman on the FSU campus. Maybe he is heading for Jameis,” a reference to Seminoles quarterback Jameis Winston. When criticized by other Twitter users for her comment, she defended her Tweet: “Since apparently I cant make a joke in all seriousness I hope everyone at FSU is safe & that the gunman is found. But I stand by my opinions.”

Winston, who is facing sexual assault accusations, was the victim of another tweet that was not just insensitive, but potentially libelous. San Francisco Chronicle’s Ann Killion reportedly tweeted “C’mon Boston College. Beat the rapist,” before deleting the tweet and apologizing.

But at ESPN, one writer was punished for behavior on Twitter that was less offensive. ESPN writer Keith Law, according to Slate, took to Twitter to debate baseball analyst Curt Schilling on evolution. Per Slate, ESPN suspended Law from Twitter, but claimed the punishment “had absolutely nothing to do with his opinions on the subject.”

While journalists can benefit from humanizing themselves on Twitter, it is important for them to do so professionally. The debate on evolution did just that, but the other cases show some reporters struggle to strike that balance.